Updates tagged

category - city council in brief

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City Council in Brief
City Council in Brief - April Edition

In brief, here are two items of public interest that were discussed during the May 2019 City Council meeting.

  • Bus Rapid Transit Routes
  • Downtown Active Transportation Network
  • Climate Change Projections and Possible Impacts
  • Downtown Event and Entertainment District
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City Council in Brief
City Council in Brief - March Edition

In brief, here are seven items of public interest that were discussed during the March 2019 City Council meeting.

  • Northeast Swale Working Group Update
  • Photo Speed Enforcement
  • 2020/2021 Multi-Year Business Plan and Budget
  • Active Transportation Implementation Plan
  • Curbside Organics Program
  • Special Needs Garbage Collection Service
  • Workplace Transformation
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City Council in Brief
City Council in Brief - February Edition

In brief, here are two items of public interest that were discussed during the February 2019 City Council meeting.

  • Recycling Services for 2020 and Beyond
  • Parking Time Restrictions in Residential Neighbourhoods 
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City Council in Brief
City Council in Brief - January Edition

In brief, here are three items of public interest that were discussed during the January 2019 City Council meeting.

  • Curbside Waste and Organics Program Update
  • Intelligent Transportation Systems Strategic Plan
  • Decorative Lighting Bylaw
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City Council in Brief
City Council in Brief - December Edition

In brief, here are four items of public interest that were discussed during the December 2018 City Council meeting.

  • Motion to rescind decision on a variable bin waste utility
  • Flood control strategy
  • Absences and support for City Councillors
  • Garden and garage suite regulations 
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City Council in Brief
2019 Budget Deliberations

The 2019 property tax increase of 4.40% is a result of a 3.79% increase for civic services, and a 0.61% increase for Police Services approved by Council during their deliberations on November 26 and 27, 2018.

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City Council in Brief
City Council in Brief - November Edition (2018)

In brief, here are four items of public interest that were discussed during the November 2018 City Council meeting.

  • Waste utility and organics program
  • Downtown arena/convention centre
  • City Council remuneration
  • Low Emissions Community report
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City Council in Brief
City Council in Brief - May Edition

In brief, here are four items of public interest that were discussed during the May 2018 City Council meeting or committee of Council.

  • Appointment of New City Manager
  • Cannabis Zoning Regulation
  • 2019 Indicative Mill Rate
  • Updates to Elections Procedures
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City Council in Brief
Council in Brief - April Update

In brief, here are four items of public interest that were discussed during the April 2018 City Council meeting.

  • 2018 Property Tax Levy
  • Residential Fire Pit
  • Storm Water Pond Safety Review
  • Joni Mitchell Promenade - River Landing
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City Council in Brief
Rising to the Challenge: City Council Sets 2018 Property Tax Increase at 4.70%

Following extensive review of the 2018 Preliminary Corporate Business Plan and Budget, November 27 and 28, 2017, Mayor Charlie Clark and City Councillors​ approved the 2018 Business Plan and Budget which includes a property tax increase of 4.70%. While continuing to face significant non-tax revenue pressures such as declines in provincial funding, the approved budget will fulfill and maintain the City’s investment plans, service level commitments and dedicated civic programs that residents rely on.

The 4.70% property tax increase will be allocated as follows: 2.78% attributed to provincial funding reductions, 1.17% to Police Services, and 0.75% to be invested in all remaining civic programs and services. Without a funding gap left as a result of declines in provincial funding, the 2018 property tax increase would have been 1.92%.